Bombay Talkies Hindi Movie Review 3rd May'13 | Bombay Talkies Hindi Movie Exclusive Review | Bombay Talkies Hindi Movie Rating | Bombay Talkies Hindi Movie Collections

Bombay Talkies Hindi Movie Review 3rd May'13 | Bombay Talkies Hindi Movie Exclusive Review | Bombay Talkies Hindi Movie Rating | Bombay Talkies Hindi Movie Collections

Bombay Talkies Hindi Movie Review 3rd May'13 | Bombay Talkies Hindi Movie Exclusive Review | Bombay Talkies Hindi Movie Rating | Bombay Talkies Hindi Movie Collections

Cast: Rani Mukerji, Randeep Hooda, Saqib Saleem, Nawazuddin Siddiqui, Sadashiv Amrapurkar, Naman Jain, Khushi Dubey, Vineet Kumar Singh, Sudhir Pandey and Amitabh Bachchan
Directors: Karan Johar, Dibakar Bannerjee, Zoya Akhtar, and Anurag Kashyap
Release date: May 3, 2013
Bombay Talkies, which a collection of four stories by four different directors is all set to release this Friday on May 3 and is much sough of for the big names like Karan Johar, Dibakar Bannerjee, Zoya Akhtar, and Anurag Kashyap associated with it. Bombay talkies is a tribute to celebrate the 100 years of Indian Cinema and the film has already got recognition as it would be screened in the 66th edition of Cannes Film Festival going to be held May 15 to 26 this month. It’s like that song written by the immortal Sahir Ludhianvi – Abhi na jao chhod kar ke dil abhi bhara nahin. No, that song isn’t part of the film. But there are songs of melody queen Lataji which haunt your senses as the restless edgy protagonists, each in search of an emotional liberation that strikes them in unexpected ways at the end of every story, seek a slice of cloudburst to nourish their parched spirits.
The first story of Bombay talkies is a Karan Johar directorial story featuring Rani Mukerji and Randeep Hooda. First story directed by Karan Johar where a sterile marriage between an urban working couple played by Rani Mukerji and Randeep Hooda is shaken by the arrival of a young ebullient homosexual (Saqib Saleem) who enters their frozen marriage in a most unexpected way. This story more than any other, pushes Indian cinema to the edge to explore a theme and emotions that have so far been swept under the carpet. Karan, whose film My Name is Khan was also about a marginalised community, strips the urban relationship of all its shock value. He looks at the three characters’ frightening spiritual emptiness with a dispassion that was denied to the characters in his earlier exploration of crumbling marital values in Kabhi Alvida Naa Kehna.
Thanks to the unsparing editing by Deepa Bhatia, a gently arousing background score by Hitesh Sonik, deft but credible dialogues penned by Niranjan Iyenger and camerawork by Anil Mehta that sweeps gently across three wounded lives, Karan is able to nail the poignancy and the irony of his urban fable in just four-five key scenes. This is his best work to date. Rani delivers another power-packed performance. But it’s Saqib who steals this segment with his unmitigated spontaneity and reined-in ebullience.
Nawazuddin Siddiqui plays a thwarted actor with a troubled past with his mentor and a difficult present in Banerjee’s story—the most cinematic of all the films. Storytelling, cinematography, music, editing and acting are in meaningful synthesis. Siddiqui lives in a chawl in Mumbai with his wife and a bedridden, depressed daughter. He tells her stories about Bollywood and Bollywood stars who he meets while trying to find work in the film industry. In an absurdist twist, Banerjee introduces a gawky emu into this congested and loud chawl milieu, which the actor owns. The emu is a reminder of one of his failed projects but has become his pet. One day, he is randomly chosen for an extra’s role on a film shoot. Within that span of a few minutes, he questions himself and his dreams. Sadashiv Amrapurkar has an engaging cameo.

Ebullient and enchanting are the descriptions that come to mind while watching Zoya Akhtar‘s film about a little boy (Naman Jain, brilliant) who would rather dance to Katrina Kaif’s song than become a cricketer or a pilot, as per the wishes of his tyrant papa (Ranveer Shorey). The household brims over with song, dance and giggles between the Katrina-enamoured boy and his sibling and confidante (a very confident Khushi Dubey). Charming, warm, humorous and vivacious, Zoya’s film serves up a very gentle moral lesson: let a child grow the way it wants to. Zoya’s movie makes our heart acquire wings. And yes, it immortalises Katrina.
An Allahabad boy’s travails outside Pratiksha, the most famous Bollywood address, is the subject of Anurag Kashyap’s story. He looks at hero worship through a father and son duo in Allahabad. The ageing father’s (Sudhir Pandey) last wish is to share a morabba(pickled Indian gooseberry), a traditional UP kitchen staple, with his hero Amitabh Bachchan. The son (Vineet Kumar Singh) arrives in Mumbai with the bottle carrying themorabba and embarks on a mission. Kashyap’s writing crackles. Dialogues and the humour are sharp. Anurag captures the sometimes-funny often-sad bustle around the Bachchan bungalow with affection. The segment certainly doesn’t lack warmth. But it could’ve done with a tighter grip over the narrative.
All the four stories are unique in some sense and reflects the mastery of all the directors.  This is a beguiling, beautiful and fitting homage to 100 years of Indian cinema. It’s also proof that different stories in an episodic film could comfortably have directors with different sensitivities staring in the same line of vision.
Movie Rating 4/5

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